In The News

 Baltimore Sun- “What Derek Chauvin did to George Floyd is absolutely policing in America for Black people in this country,” Mosby said about 10 minutes into the broadcast. “The infliction of excessive force, the violation of de-escalation policies, the refusal to render aid, the complete and utter indifference to the lives of Black people is exactly what policing has been, and continues to be in America for Black people in this country.” Read more

Fox Baltimore- It was a virtual Q and A for the public ask questions about the dramatic makeover in city prosecutions and her decision to no longer go after low level offenses from prostitution to drug possession. "We want you to hear from the horse’s mouth what our policies are what they aren’t," said Mosby. Read More

DOJ- Marcus Street, age 26, of Baltimore, Maryland, pleaded guilty today to enticing and persuading a minor victim to engage in sexually explicit conduct to produce child pornography, which Street admitted he also distributed.The guilty plea was announced by Acting United States Attorney for the District of Maryland Jonathan F. Lenzner; Special Agent in Charge James R. Mancuso of Homeland Security Investigations (HSI); Baltimore City’s State’s Attorney Marilyn J. Mosby; Commissioner Michael Harrison of the Baltimore Police Department (BPD); and Baltimore County Sheriff Jay Fisher. Read More

WBAL TV- Baltimore City State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby was one of the many prosecutors across the country who closely watched the Derek Chauvin trial. 11 TV Hill spoke with Mosby about her thoughts on the verdict and her decision to not prosecute low-level offenses in Baltimore. Read More

 Baltimore Sun - To reassure neighbors and dispel what she’s called “a great deal of misinformation,” Mosby has scheduled nine town hall meetings across the city to explain what crimes her office is and isn’t prosecuting. These virtual meetings are scheduled over the next three weeks. Read more

New York Times- Maryland’s new standards follow a decision by the Baltimore state’s attorney, Marilyn Mosby, to stop prosecuting minor crimes like prostitution and drug possession. “When we criminalize these minor offenses that have nothing to do with public safety, we expose people to needless interaction with law enforcement that, for Black people in this country, can often lead to a death sentence,” Ms. Mosby told the Baltimore City Council last week. Read More

CNN- “And while I understood the prosecutor’s argument to the jury, I wholeheartedly disagree that what Derek Chauvin did was not policing in America, because what Derek Chauvin did to George Floyd is absolutely policing in America for black people in this country. The infliction of excessive force, the violation of de-escalation policies, the refusal to render aid, the complete and utter indifference to the lives of black people is exactly what policing has been and continues to be for America — in America — for black people. So, yes, Derek Chauvin was on trial, but so was policing in America." Read More

WEAA- Baltimore City State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby joins Dr. Kaye to address policing in America. “What we have to do in this country, is we have to recognize that we have been willfully ignorant to the injustice and the overly dominant policing of ‘Black criminals’...” says Mosby. Read More

Baltimore Sun - “The family of Freddie Gray thanks [Baltimore State’s Attorney] Marilyn Mosby for courageously inspiring prosecutors across the country to prosecute bad cops,” Billy Murphy, an attorney for Gray’s family, said in reaction to Tuesday’s verdict. “They thank the good cops who did their jobs by breaking the blue wall of silence to testify against Officer Chauvin. They thank the jurors who delivered justice while the world watched. And most of all, they thank the great citizens of this country who repeatedly, forcefully and patriotically made their voices for justice heard around the globe.” Read More 

Baltimore Sun- State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby said police are indifferent to Black lives. And when police killings happen, crowds fill the streets to demand justice. Never before has there been such political and social will to change U.S. policing. Read More